Tag Archives: dance

7 Quick Takes on GTD, Dance, and Radio Buttons

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— 1 —

Although I have not been up to much besides the mad dash before Christmas, I had a bunch of fun things to share stored up from the weeks I skipped in October and November. Score another point for GTD.

Speaking of GTD, I finally published a second installment of my GTD “series,” this time on how I organize my Next Actions. I also published some key terms for GTD and for Wunderlist, with a dash of commentary for pizzazz.

— 2 —

I went swing dancing at the Fed for the first time on Thursday. I stayed out too late (even though the party was still going when I left), but I had a great time. I learned a little East Coast (triple-step) Swing to go with my growing knowledge of West Coast Swing and my Jitterbug (single-step swing). As we rotated between partners, I could tell that I was getting it, or at least that I seemed like I was getting it. My leaders who were not actually first-timers kept testing out my skills randomly. I managed not to step on or kick anybody, so that worked out.

— 3 —

After the intro lesson, I went over to the West Coast side room. (A side room is a smaller room with a different style of music and dancing than the main ballroom.) That’s why I went to the Fed in the first place. I took this month off from classes, but I didn’t want to get too rusty, and since I didn’t have class, I was available for 3rd Thursday Westie night. The first few sugar pushes felt weird, but then I found my groove again.

For better or for worse, I was mostly surrounded by people who dance less like I do and more like this:

I’m better than when I started, but I don’t have half as much style as that!

— 4 —

I’m not in dance class this month, but back in October, I got the most wonderful compliment in class from a fellow student.

My general strategy for trying things you’re unsure about is to just believe you can do it. I have psyched myself out of things before. There’s a reason athletes visualize completing passes and making goals and all that. I think you can psych yourself into things, too.

So, when I rotated around to one particular leader (who I like because he’s taller than I am), I was stunned when he complimented me out of the blue for sharing that exact concept. When we’re working on something new and I rotate to a new leader, I usually ask, “How you feelin’?” It’s a more constructive version of “hello,” and it builds camaraderie when no one is getting the pattern we’re practicing. Back in my first month on Level 3, he was not confident one week, and I told him to just believe he could do it. All those weeks later, he took the time to tell me that he’d taken my advice and started believing in himself. I was flattered, and now I know that it’s not just my head that works that way.

— 5 —

My company started using new accounting software a few months ago. In training, we had to do a lot of that awkward thing where you describe where you want someone to click, because our trainer was on a computer, but we peons weren’t. At some point, I used the term “radio button,” which confused everyone. Not everyone can handle my vocab skills.

Radio buttons are these guys:

3 radio buttons

They’re called that because they work like buttons on a radio. When you click/tap/press a radio button, it stays selected. If there is a set of 2 or more radio buttons, you can usually only click one at a time. You’ve seen them in online surveys that have questions like “select one of the following,” because the radio button forces you to select one and only one.

The funny thing is that our IT guy, who was in that training session, wasn’t familiar with “radio” button, so he heard radial. Like a tire. Which is also round, I guess. He keeps saying it now, and I don’t have the heart to correct him.

— 6 —

One quick GTD tip: how to capture while driving.

I have a long commute, so it’s not uncommon for me to think of something I need to do or buy while I’m driving to and from work. I have a holster for my phone in my car, so it’s within safe and easy reach. I do almost all of my capturing on my phone, but I can’t write while driving. It takes too much time and looking and tapping to unlock my phone, launch Wunderlist, open a new task, tap to start dictation, and capture the task. So I was stuck.

I can, however, use Siri while driving with relative ease. Siri doesn’t connect to Wunderlist, though. My solution is to use Reminders with Siri and process the tasks later. As long as I tell Siri to remind me at 9 to (fill in task or item), it works fine. The item is out of my brain, I’m still driving safely, and at 9, the reminder pops up so I can get it organized properly. Done and done.

— 7 —

Goodreads has offered me my year in books report already! I feel a little shorted since I actually have more time to read now than any other point in the year, but it’s fun to see the statistics laid out like that.


For more Quick Takes, visit This Ain’t the Lyceum.

7 Quick Takes on Cuddlr, Bromance, and a Positive Net Worth

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— 1 —

Way back in the day, some of the ladies in campus ministry formed a book club to read Girls Gone Mild (that’s mild, not the other one), by Wendy Shalit (issued in paperback as The Good Girl Revolution). It was in that book that I discovered cuddle parties: an explicitly nonsexual group pajama party where participants pay money to cuddle with other people. It was an illustration of the way that all touch has become sexualized and how desperate people are for physical contact.

In the age of Tinder, the situation has not disappeared. It’s just moved to a geolocation app. Caitlin Dewey wrote a brief Washington Post blog article about her experience with Cuddlr, “the Tinder for cuddling.” So maybe there’s no hope for humanity after all.

— 2 —

Have I mentioned lately how much I love Fr. Mike Schmitz? Not only did he tell the story of St. Maria Goretti and Alessandro Serenelli in his homily last Sunday, but he also has this video with the best, briefest description of the C.S. Lewis-style four loves I’ve ever heard:

For what it’s worth, I don’t mind “bromance” as a term. It’s better than assuming all close male friends are in a romantic relationship with each other! (They might be, but they might not be.) It’s a shame that we can’t find a linguistic way to overcome our social misguidedness (the instinct that always wants to turn best friendship into romance), but I can see a redemptive value there. We can use the concept of bromance as a scaffold toward understanding philia. We can infuse eros with a much more pure, disinterested love. That’s a solid goal, right?

— 3 —

I ran into my friend Gabby at dance class this week. She’s the same friend whose Groupon post on Facebook got me to start dancing in the first place. It was her first week on Level 3 of West Coast Swing, so I told her that I found last month complex, but not hard, per se.

Then I had to eat my words. This week was much more complicated than Week 1 of last month! I started the class by having the best dance ever for my warm-up, so I was not expecting to hit a wall like that. I am humbled. I am reviewing the summary video I took (the first video I have ever wanted or needed to take) like it’s crime scene footage!

— 4 —

I also went out for a West Coast Swing fundraiser party over the weekend. It was awesome to be in a room full of people who, by definition, came to dance WCS. I got a good balance of asking and being asked, and I got to watch some incredible dancers. I even successfully managed a duck-out move, which I have failed miserably at before. It was a great night.

— 5 —

The ordinary synod on the family has started at the Vatican. The best response is to pray. Here’s the prayer Pope Francis suggested at the end of last year’s synod:

Jesus, Mary and Joseph,
In you we contemplate
The splendor of true love.
We turn to you with confidence.

Holy Family of Nazareth,
Make our families, also,
Places of communion and cenacles of prayer,
Authentic schools of the Gospel,
And little domestic Churches.

Holy Family of Nazareth
May our families never more experience
Violence, isolation, and division:
May anyone who was wounded or scandalized
Rapidly experience consolation and healing.

Holy Family of Nazareth,
May the upcoming Synod of Bishops
Reawaken in all an awareness
Of the sacred character and inviolability of the family,
Its beauty in the project of God.

Jesus, Mary and Joseph,
Hear and answer our prayer. Amen.

— 6 —

I went to the annual liturgical minister renewal day at my parish on Saturday. I was so proud of myself for being on time, and then…

I had enough time to sit down and tweet while I waited. I could have mingled, but I found a fairly quiet spot and read the book I’d remembered to bring. Then…

So then I felt better. I don’t mind going to this thing once a year, but I do wish they would just do regular Morning Prayer instead of an adaptation.

— 7 —

On the bright side, when I got home, caught up with entering my receipts, and closed out last month’s budget, I had this surprise waiting for me in my YNAB reports:

If you remember my YNAB love story, I had a negative net worth (not including my now paid-off car). By following the Four Rules, I have managed to chip away at my debt, get control of my cash flow, and live by my priorities. This is seriously good stuff.


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Not Alone Series: Flirting

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Flirting is the special attention we give or receive from that special someone. Flirting is our way of showing the other person that we like him. There is verbal and non-verbal flirting, as well as appropriate vs. inappropriate flirting. What do you do or say to let your significant other/boyfriend know that you like him? What are ways that you like to be shown interest? What are the pros and cons of flirting?

I haven’t had a boyfriend in a while (much longer than I care to admit), so I can’t really speak to how to stay engaged in a particular relationship. Yet, because I have been flying solo (literally and figuratively) for so long, I’ve had many opportunities to work on my flirting skills. The jury’s still out on their effectiveness.

There’s definitely a moral aspect to indicating your romantic interest in someone. That’s how I define flirting: an expression of romantic interest. There’s a difference between being friendly and flirting. That line can be hard to draw, but it’s definitely there. I don’t approve of flirting to gain favors, which this Wall Street Journal article calls “instrumental flirting”. If you’re taken or not romantically interested, that’s a lot like lying.

On the other hand, if you’re not taken, flirting is a gamble. As that article also points out, some people flirt without implying any romantic interest. What if the object of your flirtation doesn’t realize you’re just playing a game you don’t mean to win? If you are romantically interested, you could discover that the one you’re flirting with (and who is even flirting back) is taken! I won’t name names, but that’s happened to me before. Not fun.

I also found it interesting to read in that WSJ essay that men tend to read more sexual undertones and stronger interest into a woman’s flirting than she intends. I don’t know how often that applies to actual humans I know, but I can see how that might happen. On the flip side, I’ve heard unfortunate remarks from men who are hesitant to even be “too polite” toward women for fear that they will light into them for being sexist—or immediately conclude that he’s “the one” and start planning their wedding.

He opened the door for me! How rude! Does he think I can’t open my own door? Do I seem weak? I’m not a child!

He opened the door for me! How polite! How charming! This will make a great story to tell our grandchildren. I wonder if he’s been saving for a wife.

That’s not a good world we’ve created.

Flirting definitely involves letting your guard down. The lovely Arleen Spenceley invited Bobby Angel to comment on what a woman should do when she’s interested in a man, and together they suggested that “a confidential conversation” could be flirtatious. I’m ambivalent about the rise of the “emotional virtue” movement, but that’s something to keep in mind. If you share things with him that you don’t tell anyone else, he might think you’re into him. Playing with emotional intimacy can be a dangerous game.

But some flirting ultimately comes with actual fun. It can be a good game. Relationship-maintenance flirting is the best kind (although you probably shouldn’t call it that; so dry), but potential-relationship flirting is an invigorating challenge. Catch his eye and hold his gaze just a tiny bit too long. (I worked on eye contact last NAS Challenge, remember?) Overly compliment something manly about him: his physical strength, his willingness to serve and sacrifice, his general politeness, his well-formed spiritual life, his intentionality and leadership skills. If he likes babies, dancing, or good conversation (#StuffCatholicGirlsLike), encourage that. Smile. Smile a lot. As I wrote a few weeks ago, physical touch is a big deal for me, so I think casual touching is definitely flirting.

Note that casual touching does not include dancing. A dance is not a marriage proposal, and partner dancing generally requires some physical contact. Dancing can be flirtatious, but dancing with a stranger should always be a no-strings-attached proposition. I experience this in class frequently. There comes a moment when the instructor has stopped us to say something, but my leader is still holding my hand (and maybe also my shoulder blade). It takes no more than ten seconds (which is a long time!) for a dance handhold to turn into holding hands. Then it gets weird. When I think it’s gotten weird, I let go, which is easier said than done because, technically, he’s holding my hand; I’m not holding his. (I could get into a whole dance tangent about not using your thumbs and “never hold on, never let go”, but I won’t.)

So I’m not against flirting as a whole. In general, what I like to do when flirting is what I like to get from a man who’s flirting with me (except the casual touching; still working on that; ask me to dance, but please don’t touch me otherwise). How about you?


Next week’s topic: Adulting

How are you still connected to your family of origin (that’s the one you grew up in: parents, siblings, and extended family) even as you are adulting (a.k.a. living as an independent adult, at home or on your own)? How has your relationship with your parents changed as you’ve grown up? How connected are you with your extended family? What aspects of these relationships do you think are affected by your being single? How do you think your family relationships would change after marriage or entering religious life? (Thanks for the topic suggestion, Bek!)

Check our Facebook Page for regular alerts of upcoming topics.

Link up with Rachel this week at Keeping It Real!

7 Quick Takes on 9/11, Captain America, and the Death Penalty

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— 1 —

9/11/2001

Never forget.

— 2 —

On a much lighter yet still patriotic note, I have learned that Captain America is the most Catholic superhero. (Yes, I’ve heard of Nightcrawler; he seems to be struggling with forgiveness and acknowledging that he is forgiven.)

I’ve been following the Ascension Presents video series for a few weeks. Fr. Mike Schmitz is such a great presenter that I follow basically everything he does. His argument contains references to several classic heresies, so there’s definitely some deeper theological insights within the discussion of men in tights. Check it out.

— 3 —

I was practicing the “survival dance” I mentioned a few weeks ago when I had a sudden epiphany: it’s bachata! The basic step in bachata is exactly the one James Joseph demonstrates in that video. Bachata can also go forwards and backwards, and you can add some turns along the same line (an invisible dance line; not “in the same line of thinking”).

So there’s a bonus to the survival dance: if you learn it and master it, you can also learn some other bachata moves to spice it up.

— 4 —

“Today the death penalty is inadmissible, no matter how serious the crime of the condemned. It is an offense against the inviolability of life and the dignity of the human person that contradicts God’s plan for man and society and His merciful justice, and it impedes fulfilling the just end of the punishments. It does not do justice to the victims, but foments vengeance.” —Pope Francis, Letter to the International Commission Against the Death Penalty

— 5 —

I had to go back to heavy things. I am openly against the death penalty. Although I acknowledge that Catholics are allowed to support it, I don’t think we should. Accordingly, I follow the Catholic Mobilizing Network to End the Death Penalty. It needs a less clunky name, but its goal is one I believe in.

The CMN editors recently shared a response by Dale S. Recinella addressing three common myths about why the death penalty is necessary: that it lowers the murder rate within prisons, that it is a deterrent to terrorism, and that it is a deterrent to homicide (in general and of law enforcement and judicial employees). He also offers economic data to show that executions are not less expensive than life imprisonment (both in terms of court costs and prison costs) and the theological truth that no one is beyond redemption. It’s worth reading.

— 6 —

I watch TV while I eat. Since we don’t have cable and I only follow so many TV shows, I sometimes watch YouTube videos instead. Ave Maria Press has an archive of recorded webinars, so I watched their young adult ministry roundtable from last year. The presenters made some excellent points. Having worked in ministry and been involved in various cities, parishes, and phases of my life, I am convinced that there is no cookie-cutter approach to any age-specific ministry.

The Church is great at youth ministry because it’s so much like school. We can do school. Adults aren’t always interested in school-like faith formation, though. It can be tough when you’re unmarried and don’t have children, or you’re married and don’t have children, or you’re married with children, and you get lumped in together with everyone else because you’re roughly the same age. The first group tends to like happy hour, but the third can only attend child-friendly events or ones with babysitting. Not every parish is big enough for a young adult group. Not everyone likes groups. Not every young adult is even registered with a parish (that tends to happen at marriage or the baptism of a child).

“Every parish doesn’t need a young adult group, but every parish had better minister to young adults.” —Jonathan Lewis, Archdiocese of Washington

I don’t have any solutions, but I’m glad I’m not the only one wrestling with the questions. One size does not fit all.

— 7 —

I went to a friend’s private karaoke party on Sunday, so I now have “We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together” stuck in my head. You’re welcome for the throwback.


For more Quick Takes, visit This Ain’t the Lyceum.

7 Quick Takes That Are Legitimately Quick Again!

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— 1 —

I got another referral credit for YNAB! Thank you, anonymous purchaser!

At this point, that means I spent 10% less when I bought it and have earned another 20% of the original purchase price ($60) since then. I’m not saying everyone will reap the same rewards, but it’s worth a shot, right? I have almost attained a positive (cash) net worth in about a year and a half thanks to YNAB. Refresh your memory on my YNAB journey, and then use my discount/referral link to save on getting YNAB for yourself!

— 2 —

I published my thoughts on the dumb-sounding phrase “capital-T tradition” yesterday. After the traffic I’ve been getting from my first post about Wunderlist and GTD, I knew it was time to press publish on that one, too.

One additional thought I have is about the word “tradition” at all. I prefer to use the words “custom” and “customary” in place of “tradition” and “traditional” when I talk about practices and beliefs that can change. For example, it’s not “traditional” to receive Communion on the tongue; it’s customary. There are several options that have been more popular or less popular over time. You can choose the one that works for you, and you are not a bad Catholic if your favorite isn’t someone else’s favorite.

“Traditional” is also easy ammunition for picking fights. As I heard on an episode of the Catching Foxes podcast recently, why do we always seem to argue only with people who believe and do 95% of the same things we do?

— 3 —

I dance West Coast Swing so that I can eat more cupcakes.

The fun, social applications, and exercise are just gimmicks.

— 4 —

That video with Jackie Francois Angel and Bobby Angel I mentioned last week had a couple of money quotes from Bobby, too, that stuck with me:

Loneliness is God knocking on your heart, asking you to spend time with him.

The great part is that even if all you do is whine to God about how lonely you are, he’ll listen. He gets it. It was lonely on the Cross, too.

Jesus, I trust in you. That’s a really easy prayer to say, but it’s a really hard prayer to do.

Yep.

— 5 —

Further on dance, this week was my first time in Level 3, and it was awesome! The class was very full, but we managed to all warm up to “Uptown Funk” (slowed down slightly) without colliding. Slot dances are the best. I recognized several faces I’d seen in previous levels and at social dances. The patterns we learned were tricky, but I feel pretty confident about them.

I had two great moments. First, one of the leaders seemed un-confident when I rotated to him, but after we went through the pattern the first time, he said, “I do believe you’re making me look good.” Aww, yeah. Then, the next leader could sense that I was getting it, so he dipped me! I still can’t quite get my form right, but we both stayed on our feet, so I’m calling that a win.

— 6 —

I got to visit one of our in-progress construction sites for work this week. I’ve been to another one, but that was so close to finished that the client had already moved in. The air conditioning was on there. This one is mostly just piles of dirt with a couple of cool features in progress. I’m pretty sure I kicked up the style of the site about ten notches by being (a) the only woman, and (b) still dressed nicely, even though it was Friday, because I always dress for work. Getting to see the people and, well, dirt that becomes paperwork and dollar signs on my end definitely widened my perspective.

— 7 —

Today was my brother’s first real college football game. He is a sophomore by credit but took a redshirt year for eligibility. They won! I came in heavy on brains in the family, so he helps balance it out with some brawn.


For more Quick Takes, visit This Ain’t the Lyceum.

7 Quick Takes That Are Actually Quick This Time

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— 1 —

My long-term attempt to establish a bedtime has been going much better than usual over the past few weeks. I’m behind on my blog reading, but I found myself at Jen Fulwiler’s rebranded site recently reading an old post about how to survive burnout. (Thanks for the link in your Monday Musings a few weeks ago, Kim; I needed that.) Her first recommendation was to get more sleep. Message heard; life changes begrudgingly made.

— 2 —

I watched a Theology-on-Tap style presentation that Bobby and Jackie Angel gave a few weeks ago in New York City. It’s about a Catholic vision of dating, and it’s worth a watch if you’ve got some time. There are some gems in there. The best was a (parody) Catholic pick-up line dropped by Jackie:

I would say “God bless you,” but clearly, he already has.

— 3 —

My office wi-fi password has been the same since I started working for the company two years ago. It ends in a string of letters. I always thought they were random, or maybe based on someone’s name who is no longer with the company. One of the superintendents came into the office and asked me for the password, and he instantly connected those “random” letters with a phrase that totally makes sense. Never underestimate construction guys, and never overestimate yourself: lesson learned.

— 4 —

After my explanation of how finding the beat is critical to learning to dance and linking to a simple video teaching the same, my dance teacher gave a very quick lesson in doing that exact thing. It happened last week and with such uncanny timing that he might have been reading my blog! (He could be; I guess. It’s public. That’s my name and picture in the sidebar.)

It’s more likely that he just noticed how incredibly off the beat some of us were and knew he needed to fix it ASAP. But what’s life without a tiny bit of feeling like you’re being watched? Being watched in class worked out for me, because my teacher complimented me when I randomly helped him demonstrate the pattern from two weeks ago, and that ultimately led to this milestone:

— 5 —

Grammar news is not terribly frequent, so I don’t post about it here as much as I think about it in my day-to-day. I greatly enjoyed reading Neal Whitman’s essay, read by Grammar Girl on her podcast, about why English words have silent letters. That’s more of a pronunciation, linguistic, and spelling issue than a grammar one, but it’s just as fascinating. My standard explanation is that funky silent letters are found in non-English words that we have “borrowed” into English. We’re never giving them back, but we’ll “borrow” the extra letters just the same. We just won’t pronounce them. So there!

— 6 —

Continuing on my theme of “favorite topics I don’t actually blog about very often,” I stumbled across this amazing sheet of J.K. Rowling’s plot outline for Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix via the Goodreads blog. It’s incredible!

I don’t care much about plotting vs. pantsing. Whatever she did worked out swimmingly. What sticks out to me are two of the column headings. The original poster seems to have missed it, but it looks like Dumbledore’s Army and the Order of the Phoenix were originally reversed! Read the columns. The things that are listed as happening to the “O of P” happen to Dumbledore’s Army in the published novel, and vice versa. I support the switch. I’m less supportive of changing Umbridge’s first name from “Elvira.” That is a much less likeable name than” Dolores.”

— 7 —

In case you missed it, I posted a reflection on some marriage advice for singles to Austin CNM last week. Even if you disagree with his conclusions, there’s some useful food for thought. Single people need marriage advice, too!


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7 Quick Takes on How to Find the Beat and How Not to Miss the Company Meeting

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— 1 —

I wrote last week’s takes long before I published them, so I wasn’t able to include my most recent dance intro because it hadn’t happened yet. I took a friend to Newcomer Night several months ago to learn a sprinkling of Foxtrot and Jitterbug. Last week, I took a different friend to refresh my Salsa and learn a sprinkling of Bachata.

She got there a little late, so I had to leap right into the Bachata lesson. By listening, I was able to pick up that all I’d missed were discussions of walking steps versus triple steps. NBD. It was relatively easy to reprogram my brain for Bachata since that started by moving side-to-side (whereas West Coast Swing and Two-Step move mainly backwards and forwards).

— 2 —

I also learned that I should stop taking beginning Salsa lessons. I think that was my fourth overall. I have a total of three moves, but I am a pro at those three moves! If I get some extra cash, I might dip into Salsa 1 at my studio. It meets right before my regular West Coast Swing class. Maybe that’s not a coincidence.

— 3 —

My company has a quarterly, off-site, all-hands meeting. They are scheduled at the beginning of the company year in February, but our COO usually sends a reminder email about two weeks in advance. You know the kind: “Be there. If you think you can talk your way out of it, you have one week to do so.”

This time, we did not get that reminder. If I hadn’t overheard one of my project managers talking to my old boss about it in the hallway, I would have forgotten completely—and I don’t think I would have been the only one. It worked out in the end, but I have little doubt that if I hadn’t been cubicle eavesdropping, I would have been sitting at my desk, happily typing away, when people started leaving for the meeting.

The moral of the story: always look ahead on your calendar.

— 4 —

I’ve been learning to dance West Coast Swing for a few months now, but (of course) I can only dance it with someone who can lead it. In the course of my Internet research (you are not surprised that I do research), I found a video showing probably the easiest dance on planet Earth that is not the middle school sway.

See? Even if you think you can’t dance, you can probably learn to do that, especially to something with a strong, thumping bass. DJ Snake songs are some of my favorites to dance WCS to, actually. The beat drops, and all is well.

— 5 —

The creator/author of the previous video, James Joseph, also has one on how to find and count sets of 8. I used to play instruments, so that’s second nature for me. I have actually physically stumbled when someone starts on 2 or 6 because I can feel in my body how unnatural that is.

James Joseph makes a point I have yet to see anywhere else: all dance teachers expect you to know how to find and count beats of music, but none of them teach you how to find and count beats of music. In their defense, they’re not music teachers. Yet you must know how to find 1 if you’re ever going to learn to lead a dance to music. When your teacher kicks you out of the nest and says, “Here’s some music; start on your own,” you must fly!

If you know me in real life, I can help you learn this. I have rhythm and a teaching degree (in English, but it’s more broadly applicable than that).

— 6 —

Dennis, Nell, Edna, Leon, Nedra, Anita, Rolf, Nora, Alice, Carol, Leo, Jane, Reed, Dena, Dale, Basil, Rae, Penny, Lana, Dave, Denny, Lena, Ida, Bernadette, Ben, Ray, Lila, Nina, Jo, Ira, Mara, Sara, Mario, Jan, Ina, Lily, Arne, Bette, Dan, Reba, Diane, Lynn, Ed, Eva, Dana, Lynne, Pearl, Isabel, Ada, Ned, Dee, Rena, Joel, Lora, Cecil, Aaron, Flora, Tina, Arden, Noel, and Ellen sinned.

That is a palindrome. Mind. Blown. Courtesy of Grammarly.

— 7 —

I was so excited about this last week that I forgot to blog it: the relics of St. Maria Goretti are coming to the U.S. this fall. She is my absolute favorite saint. I pray her novena every summer. Her relics have never been brought to the U.S. before, and one of the cities she will visit is just a few hours away from me: Houston.

I don’t really believe in coincidences, but I do believe in small miracles. I just happened to be living in the perfect region to fairly easily see Pope Benedict when he visited the U.S. I won’t be able to see Pope Francis in Philly, but not taking the time and money to do that will enable me to take the time and money to do this.

Really, what more could I ask for?


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