Tag Archives: jeopardy

Currently: June 2017

Currently at Lindsay Loves

My May kind of crawled along, much like April, but then it picked up like crazy! The last few days have been slightly overwhelming. I’m not engaged; I just got a job. Blog-appropriate details are forthcoming.

Here’s what I am currently…

Planning: Well, my life is kind of up in the air at the moment. This is good because having a job means I have things to do, but it’s bad because I sort of had a life beforehand. I love habits and routines, and mine have changed a lot. Setting new routines will take a while, and although I am glad to have the reason for the changes, I’m anxious about how those changes are actually going to go.

Yes, that is all vague. It’s vague on purpose.

Wishing: I had put more attention into completing my personal projects when I had more time on my hands. I’m delighted to have kept up my prayer habits, worked on my Spanish vocabulary, and read the entire books of Wisdom, Timothy, and 1 Peter, but my physical files are just as sloppy as they were before.

Learning: The ropes of my new job. I forgot how awful it is to be the new girl, but there are some clear advantages. I’m older, so I know my self-worth, maturity, and capabilities. I’ve experienced enough company and organizational cultures to know that every one is different. You just have to learn over time who to trust, who has your back, and how things go around the place (especially as they relate to the way they’re supposed to go). That was probably one of my best takeaways from my last job: figuring out the culture, finding my place in it, and rejecting it where appropriate.

Browsing: The J-Archive. Since I watch the show live most days now, I’m really just looking for the winners’ Coryat scores (at-home score equivalents) to see how well or poorly I’m doing. I got Final Jeopardy! wrong for over a week a while back, which was sobering. Without the data, though, I wouldn’t have realized that at all.

Going: To visit Mr. Man’s family for Memorial Day. Most of my friends in Austin were too far into parenting for a young adult celebration of holidays, but not far enough into it for a family-plus-friends-and-their-families gathering, so I spent most of my holidays alone for a while. It was nice to not be alone.

Recapping: May

  • I started blogging about using Todoist instead of Wunderlist.
  • I became re-certified in Adult CPR and AED. I am now qualified to save your life.
  • Mr. Man and I crushed at trivia (more than once!), attended a wedding together (just the one time), and finished watching the first season of A Series of Unfortunate Events. I think I can safely say we enjoyed all of these things.
  • I got my teaching license renewed.

So what’s new with you? What are you learning currently?


Currently is hosted on the first Wednesday of each month by Anne of In Residence. This month’s guest co-host is Erin of Love, Fun, and Football. Won’t you join us?

7 Quick Takes on Criticism, Feedback, and the Rosary

7 Quick Takes, hosted at This Ain't the Lyceum

— 1 —

I caused a bit of a kerfuffle in the comments section after last week’s take on constructive criticism. I’ve been reading advice from Gottman Certified Therapists for several months now (maybe even years), so I’m very familiar with the lingo. As with basically all areas of my life, words were very important to the point I was trying to make there. I was working with the Gottman definition of criticism, which is very specific and applies to the thoughts I shared. If you define it differently, then yes, I might have sounded like a crazy person.

The Gottmans are known for their Love Lab, wherein they videotaped couples after asking them to recall a recent disagreement. Through analyzing these conversations, they identified four major behaviors that were far more prevalent in couples that eventually divorced than in couples that stayed together. He calls them the four horsemen of the apocalypse: criticism, contempt, stonewalling, and defensiveness.

So when I hear “criticism,” I hear “horseman of the relationship apocalypse.” That’s why I think constructive criticism ruins relationships, at home and in the world.

— 2 —

Some of the comment-section discussion on whether constructive criticism can ever be okay turned more towards “feedback.” I think of feedback as being positive, negative, or even neutral, but some people have the same aversion to that word as I do to “criticism.” Smart, Pretty, and Awkward recently included a link to an article about asking for advice instead of feedback. As a culture, we know that advice is meant to be helpful. If someone gives you unhelpful advice (or advice you don’t want to take), you just ignore it. That’s a strategy I can get behind.

— 3 —

I go grocery shopping every Saturday, and today this happened:

— 4 —

I also watch Jeopardy! almost every day, and this week, this happened:

— 5 —

I use Windows 10, and after the most recent major update (it’s called the “Creators Update”), I kept seeing an all-black window flash across the screen at random times. It was too fast for me to see, and I thought it was a fluke the first time, but it got annoying very quickly. So, once I caught enough of a glimpse during the split-second to have a phrase to Google, I found some help over at Ghacks to stop the pop-up. And now it’s gone.

— 6 —

I think I’m a terrible Catholic because I stopped liking the rosary. I used to pray it on my agonizingly long commute home every day, but after a few weeks here in Louisville sans commute, it started feeling like a chore. I know, I know! I couldn’t not pray, though, so I switched to the Divine Mercy Chaplet, and all is well once again. Except when I forget that the Hail Mary is followed by the Apostles Creed and not a Glory Be, but that’s easily resolved.

— 7 —

I got some positive work-related news this week, but nothing I’m ready to blog about. It’s nice to finally have some.


For more Quick Takes, visit This Ain’t the Lyceum.

7 Quick Takes because I am back in action!

7 Quick Takes, hosted at This Ain't the Lyceum

Heeeeeeeey there, 7QT! It’s been a long time. I have kept up with Sunday Style and Currently, but this happy little link-up was tossed by the wayside. I have far more than seven things to share, but I will keep it to seven anyway. You’re welcome.

— 1 —

One of my life’s ambitions is to compete on Jeopardy! I auditioned last April and am still in the contestant pool. Here’s hoping!

My hopes aside, the show was recently in the news for a unique contestant story: Cindy Stowell, an Austin resident like me, died of colon cancer just a few days before she appeared on Jeopardy!

She won six games. If she were still alive, she would be a contender for the Tournament of Champions.

She took the test in the same round that I did, and if I had not gone back to DC to audition (because my parents live in the area, so I could stay with them for free), I would have auditioned in the same city that she did. She even played trivia at the same place I do; her boyfriend Jason has a regular team that always plays well.

Cindy’s Jeopardy! story shows the compassion that can still be found in what is ultimately the entertainment business. It also brings a new level of challenge to the armchair champion. If she could play like that while dying from cancer, what’s stopping you from fighting for your dreams?

— 2 —

This is kind of an intermediate tech tip. If you don’t know what two-factor authentication is, just go ahead and skip this take—but look into it! This Google landing page is a simple intro, and this TFA site will show you which popular sites you can enable it on.

If you are using TFA, and you use an Apple device of any kind, you might have been asked by your device if you wanted to turn on “two-factor authentication.” This is not the same thing as normal TFA. Owen Williams at The Next Web explains the situation in detail, but the short version is that you want to have “two-step verification” enabled for your Apple ID, not “two-factor authentication.”

I am smarter than your average bear when it comes to computers and technology (and specific terms, for that matter), but I was confused by that one. I managed to fix it, but it was a close call. I hope this tip helps someone the way my Sitemeter hijacking story does.

— 3 —

Those were some pretty intense takes. Here’s some tweets to lighten the mood. This one won the National Grammar Day haiku contest just a few weeks ago:

— 4 —

Also in Twitter news, a bishop is following me! This seems like a role reversal if there ever was one:

"Bishop Guy Sansaricq followed you."

He’s retired from the Diocese of Brooklyn. Can we take a moment to think about how awesome retirement must be if it means you just get to play on Twitter all day?

— 5 —

I recently finished the Bible study I started back in September, on salvation history. When we got to the period when David became king of Israel, I finally, finally understood why it’s so important that David is the son of Jesse.

Jesse was no one important. He wasn’t the previous king; he was just a shepherd.

In that time (and in some professions like teaching or law enforcement today), a son had the same job as his father. The king’s son became the next king; the shepherd’s son became a shepherd.

But the king before David was Saul. None of Saul’s sons became king. David was the son of Jesse. David became the king.

It’s important that David is the son of Jesse because David is not the son of Saul. God chose the king he wanted, not the king anyone was expecting. He chose David, and later he chose Jesus.

And that’s why we have Jesse trees, not David trees, and why it’s so important that Jesus is “the son of David.” My mind was blown.

— 6 —

Mr. Man teases me for declaring that more than one song is my jam. I like to jam! So I guess one of my jams is this super-catchy song (and awesome video) from a Target commercial: “Diggy,” by Spencer Ludwig.

— 7 —

Finally, to round out the randomness, one of my favorite Shakespearean webcomics posted a brilliant take on the “wherefore” problem. (And yes, I do have another favorite.)


For more Quick Takes, visit This Ain’t the Lyceum.

7 Quick Takes on Appliance Breakdowns, TopGolf, and Productivity Pros

7 Quick Takes, hosted at This Ain't the Lyceum

— 1 —

No Jeopardy! clues this week, but I am happy to say that I was on a hot streak this week. Since my audition in April, I’ve been practicing continuously. I go out for pub quiz, Mr. Man helps me with the J! Archive, and I play J!6 every day. This week, I managed so many 6/6 scores that I finally brought my overall accuracy up to 83%. I still need to work on my presidents and world leaders, though. There’s just so many! #girlmeetsworld

Also, there was this little gem from the reigning Tournament of Champions winner, because Twitter makes the world seem so much smaller:

Alex Jacob fist bump

— 2 —

After almost six years in Texas, I have finally eaten at Taco Cabana. I don’t know how I missed it for so long. The verdict: tasty, fast flautas; delicious tortillas; meh sides. I love flautas, so that was a big selling point for me. Overall, I was much happier than I’ve ever been eating Taco Bell.

— 3 —

We are blessed to have a variety of priests and deacons to offer Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament at Spirit & Truth three weeks a month. Sometimes they just bring Jesus out; sometimes they stay after to give a presentation or Bible study. One of my deacon friends came this week, but he was unable to stay for Bible study. To say sorry, he brought us Tiff’s Treats! I was flabbergasted, and I kind of felt bad for all the people who rushed out the door right after benediction. They missed out on cookies! Granted, church does not usually have cookies, but they might have stuck around for a warm snickerdoodle; I don’t know.

— 4 —

Our hot water heater is broken. I had to take a very long, very cold shower yesterday, and a shorter, still cold one this morning before work. Soon after I publish this post, I am using the spare key to my friend’s condo to take a hot shower at her place. She initially gave it to me because (a) someone should have your spare key, especially when single-girl life hasn’t left you without someone to keep it for you, and (b) our dryer broke a few weeks ago, so I have a backup now that is not a laundromat. I like living in this house, but this year has not been great for appliances.

— 5 —

I read and listen to a lot of productivity talk. Recently, I found myself getting very frustrated that all the productivity pros are married freelancers. I have seen exactly two places even mention the time and energy that goes into actually getting married—not planning a wedding or completing marriage prep, but finding someone to marry if you haven’t already locked it down (a.k.a. the story of my life). One installment of the excellent GTD Refresh series at Lifehack mentioned that dating takes work, and there are various mentions in articles at Asian Efficiency. I could stand for a nod here or there to us unmarried people.

As far as freelancing, I encountered my first productivity speaker who has a regular job working for The Man, Jessica Turner, just last month. I would bet dollars to donuts that most of the customer base for these outlets consists of people with regular jobs. Why doesn’t that get more acknowledgement? Maximizing your time and organizing your life looks different when you’re at the mercy of one big boss versus dozens of tiny client bosses.

— 6 —

Despite my frustration from the last Quick Take, I do still read and listen to all those productivity pros. This week, I found cause to grumble at Asian Efficiency. They’re on a promotional swing for the 12-Week Year, a concept from the book of the same name. In the most recent email, though, they came down really hard against GTD.

Many of the smaller e-newsletters I subscribe to invite replies. They actually work by just hitting “reply,” which is a pretty sweet technological trick. I went through a similar “I think you’re seeing GTD as more rigid and less useful than it is” debate with Mike Vardy of Productivityist. When I tweeted my comments, I wasn’t expecting a reply from Mike himself, but I totally got one. Similarly, I received a reply to my 12WY-versus-GTD comments from Thanh Pham, co-founder of Asian Efficiency.

So I get frustrated, but I do my best to keep to the most direct, private channels I can find (which I consider the principle of subsidiarity in action), and I get real responses from actual humans. That is something I completely support.

— 7 —

My company sponsored a social event this week at TopGolf Austin. It was actually pretty fun. I managed to hit several balls, and I think I even made one straight into the target one time (as opposed to two or three others that just rolled in). It was nice to not have to give up my entire evening for an event like the Christmas party. It’s also astounding to think that, not that long ago, the GPS trackers in every ball were classified military technology. Now, we use it for fun times.

Altogether, considering TopGolf and mini golf, I think I prefer bowling. My parents met bowling, so I am not awful, but also not great.


For more Quick Takes, visit This Ain’t the Lyceum.

7 Quick Takes on Event-Filled Weeks and Jeopardy!

7 Quick Takes, hosted at This Ain't the Lyceum

— 1 —

I am about halfway through another big swing of events. I had a couple of Skype and phone dates filling up my weeknights. I was up early and out until mid-afternoon yesterday, then I did chores until I went back out again. An old friend came into town this weekend, so a group met up for dinner after church. This coming week, I will have another friend date, stop by the summer church history study at my parish, go to a work social event, and make a day-long retreat. All of this activity is crazy, but it is a blessing to have so many friends and to not be bored!

— 2 —

I was up early on Saturday for the saddest reason. Some dear friends of mine lost their son to stillbirth last week. They buried him this weekend. It was the most beautiful and terrible experience. It was beautiful because the Mass is always beautiful (heaven touches Earth!) and because it was at the same church where they were married about a year and a half ago. The church was about as full both times, which is a testament to the community they have built. It was terrible because the death of a child is always terrible. I could only express my sorrow and assure them of my prayers.

— 3 —

I’m still working through my Life Plan. It’s supposed to be a living document, so I’m doing my best to keep it fresh without giving in to my tendency to revise endlessly. I came across a quotation that I hope will help me focus my efforts:

“There is nothing so useless as doing efficiently that which should not be done at all.” —Peter Drucker

— 4 —

Also a Church Word: It's defined as a coherent, typically large body of matter with no definite shape. What is matter?

J!6 has so many Lindsay-friendly clues! As I said before, I am hoping that some of these kinds of clues actually make it to the show if I, too, make it to the show.

— 5 —

Whose What?: Dumbledore's Army is a fictional organization that held meetings in this school. What is Hogwarts?

Seriously.

— 6 —

International Days of the Week: Of dies mercurii, dies solis, or dies martis, it's Wednesday in Latin. What is dies mercurii?

Mr. Man works with Latin, so I was especially proud to share that one with him. I only know church Latin and what I can make out from my knowledge of Spanish. For this clue, I used the latter.

— 7 —

Mr. Man himself sent me this one, perhaps suggesting that this would be a worthy pastime if I become independently wealthy:

If you watch Jeopardy! backwards, it's a show about rich people paying money for answers to questions.


For more Quick Takes, visit This Ain’t the Lyceum.

7 Quick Takes on Reflection, Discussion, and My New Computer

7 Quick Takes, hosted at This Ain't the Lyceum

— 1 —

It’s almost Pentecost. I had a lot on my mind going into this week, and I was hoping that my buddy the Holy Spirit would show up for me as I prayed my novena. Well. You get what you pray for, especially when it is a host of things that make you reflect. I’m looking forward to a quiet, normal weekend, during which I will hopefully have the opportunity to reflect on everything that’s swirling around in my mind.

— 2 —

We discussed mercy throughout the ATX Catholic Retreat a few weeks ago. I was on a panel featuring fellow contributors (and people I know offline) Kraft and Trenton, and we talked about technology and mercy. It sounds like a strange topic at first, but I was pleased with the way the conversation went. I had to take some of my own advice, so I’m pretty sure that didn’t come from my heart alone. (See the note about my pal in Quick Take #1.)

You can listen to a recording of the mercy and technology panel discussion over at ATX Catholic. The post also features a rare photo of me without my shoulders covered. (I took a sweater for the time we spent in the Shrine’s chapel; I don’t like being in churches with bare shoulders.)

— 3 —

It took several days for me to unbox my new computer, but I finally got around to it. I just didn’t want to put in the time, and I struggle with change.

I had my first laptop, a Dell Inspiron 1150, for over five years (all the way through college and halfway through grad school) until it died. There was a manufacturing defect that made it overheat constantly, but I got Dell to replace the faulty part for free, out of warranty. (Yes, that’s another throwback, can-you-find-my-comment post.) Then the operating system failed, so it wouldn’t start. The Geek Squad at Best Buy removed the hard drive for me, I enclosed it, and I saved all my data!

This time around, when my HP Pavilion (currently just over eight years old) started to enter the throes of death, I started backing up my files. The computer actually still works… if I remove the battery completely, keep it plugged in, and hibernate it before unplugging. It’s a tedious strategy that keeps me tethered to the wall, but the computer’s been working okay despite limping along. I knew I needed a new one, though, so I saved up for it and finally pulled the trigger so I can devote that saving momentum elsewhere.

My new Pavilion has Windows 10, so I’m learning to use that. It feels like a flatter version of Windows 7, which was a shinier version of Windows XP, so I think I’ll be okay. I’ve managed to avoid the versions that everyone hated (Vista and 8). Coincidentally, this computer is a shinier, flatter version of my old computer. I did have to solve a Skype–Windows 10-specific microphone problem. Skype is essential to my relational life; I am very grateful to Mr. Man for helping me find a solution.

— 4 —

Category: 10-Letter Words; In the Catholic religion, there are 7 of these Jesus establish and entrusted to the Church.

Category: Communication; The signal that a papal election is complete is smoke of this color coming out of the Sistine Chapel chimney.

Whaaaaaaaaat? Jeopardy! has had some amazing categories during the Teachers Tournament. The sad part is that, because this is J!6, those questions were not actually asked on the show. I can only hope the actual aired questions are that awesome if I get on. I’ve got seventeen more months in the contestant pool; there’s plenty of time for the awesomeness to swing back around.

— 5 —

The best short commentary on the presidential prayer of Jesus (John 17) is that they are the words of a dying man, so they are completely honest.

The best long commentary might be this by my other buddy, St. Augustine:

When he had said to his Father: “And now I will no longer be in the world…; I am coming to you” (Jn 17:11), our Lord recommended to his Father those who were about to be deprived of his physical presence: “Holy Father, keep them in your name that you have given to me.” As man, Jesus prays to God for the disciples he has received from God. But note what follows: “So that they may be one just as we are.” He does not say: That they may be one with us, or: So that they and we together may be one thing just as we are one, but he says: “That they may be one just as we are.” That they may be one in their nature just as we are one in ours. The truth is that these words imply that Jesus spoke as having the same divine nature as his Father, as he says elsewhere: “The Father and I are one,” (Jn 10,30). According to his human nature he had said: “My Father is greater than I, “ (Jn 14,28), but since God and man form one and the same person in him, we understand that he is man because he prays and understand him to be God because he is one thing with the one to whom he prays.

“But now I am coming to you. I speak this in the world so that they may share my joy completely.” As yet he has not left the world; he is still there; but since he is shortly going to leave it, he is no longer in it, so to speak. But what is that joy with which he wants his disciples to be filled? This he has already explained a little before, when he said: “That they may be one as we are.” Concerning this joy, which belongs to him and which he has given to them, he foretells to them the perfect fulfillment and that is why he speaks about it “in the world”. This joy is the peace and happiness of the world to come and, to gain it, we must live in the present world with self-restraint, justice and devotion.

— 6 —

I went to my friend Don’s Derby party again. It was delightful, although I would have appreciated it starting on time. That is part of why I don’t like football: you never know when the game is going to end. I have things other than spectating to do. Everyone else can go spectate without me; that’s cool. Have fun.

— 7 —

It’s raining today, which is not a common occurrence in Austin. We were in a drought so severe that several islands our big lake emerged. They’re usually underwater. Now they’ve disappeared again, but I still can’t get used to life with regular rainfall patterns.


For more Quick Takes, visit This Ain’t the Lyceum.

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