Tag Archives: sundaystyle

Sunday Style: Short and Sweet

By “short and sweet,” I don’t mean to suggest that I wore a short skirt, or that I thought this outfit was particularly sweet. Neither are true. I mean the homily.

Sunday Style for August 6

Dress and undershirt: Target
Shoes: Payless
Earrings: Renaissance festival
Necklace: holy medals

My outfit selection process was brief. We’re having a cool snap in Louisville, such that temperatures are hovering in the 70’s. This is cool after weeks of days in the 90’s. I took the opportunity to wear one of my warm-but-not-too-warm outfits. I’m not sure I think these shoes match anymore, though. Chocolate brown isn’t completely neutral, after all. They were good enough for this purpose.

Fr. F began his reflection on the Transfiguration (after a baseball stat diversion) by saying that the Transfiguration shows us and the disciples who Jesus really is and what he’s all about. Many of Jesus’ followers were interested in him because they could tell he was gaining power. They were hangers-on hoping for some power of their own. By showing Peter, James, and John his true nature as the son of God, the fulfillment of the law and the prophets, Jesus clarifies the source of his power and his ultimate goal.

He also noted that some of us today want to reach out and grasp at Jesus the way Peter wanted to settle in on the mountain. He wanted to be close to Jesus. We also want to be close to him, but we might forget that we are already as close as we can be this side of heaven when we receive Jesus in the Eucharist. He comes to rest in our tabernacles; he comes to transform our hearts. How could we be any closer?

It was a brief homily; I take notes as it’s being given each week, and what I’ve shared here is the bulk of my notes. It contained more than one sweet note, though, and that works for me.


For more Mass fashion and commentary, visit Rosie at A Blog for My Mom for My Sunday Best.

My Sunday Best, hosted at A Blog for My Mom

Sunday Style: Do the Parish-Hall Shuffle

Technically, I have not been in any parish halls yet. I don’t think Mr. Man’s parish has an official “hall.” I just couldn’t resist the 80’s reference! I am still bouncing around parishes as my summer schedule melts toward the school year, so here’s what I wore for the last two Sundays of July:

July 22

Sunday Style for July 22

Top: Target
Skirt: Old Navy
Shoes: Payless
Necklace: Target
Earrings: Renaissance festival

It was hot, but not super hot. I first tried this outfit combination last summer in Austin, so I knew I’d be fine here in Louisville. I like the way it balances the lightness of the skirt with the relative heaviness of the top, black with white, and short with long(-ish 3/4 sleeves). I went to Mass solo, so I took the opportunity to wear my least practical shoes. The photos don’t quite show it, but they are cork wedges, so I have to walk very carefully in them, and I can’t drive comfortably in them. Mr. Man graciously accommodates my adjusted gait when I wear my fancy shoes, but I can tell that he would prefer I lean toward more practical styles more often. But he wasn’t with me, so fancy shoes were a go!

I went to what has now officially become my parish. I don’t recognize the priests by sight yet, so I’m not 100% sure who gave the homily. He started by listing some of the more common heresies, along with brief but accurate definitions. In particular, he focused on dualism since dualists are big fan’s of the day’s Gospel. It seems to support the (heretical) idea that the existence of evil means there’s an evil creator and that part of creation itself is evil. That means there should be no sacraments, no marriage, no kids, and “no fun.” That view is wrong.

On the contrary, especially paired with the strong message of monotheism and the goodness of the one God in the first reading, the Gospel supports God as the Church teaches him to be. The priest made a comparison to The Silmarillion, a prequel to The Lord of the Rings, in which God sings the universe into existence. Evil is a discordant note that enters the song. Rather than halting the song or the discordant note, God mercifully rearranges the other voices so that the evil note becomes complementary.

So this priest was a big nerd, but he was among my favorite kind of nerds.

July 30

Sunday Style for July 30

Top and skirt: Target
Shoes: Payless
Necklace and earrings: Charming Charlie

This week, what I had in mind was how much I missed the way I used to dress. This is the kind of outfit I wore to work when I had my old job (with more practical shoes, of course). I haven’t worked at that job in months, though, and my current job requires a uniform, so I was out of touch with my sense of style. It was nice to feel dressed like myself again.

Due to that current job, I needed to go to Mass on Sunday morning, so I zipped over to Mr. Man’s parish (but again, without him). One of the priests made a plea at the beginning of his homily for us to work to increase the parish. This made me feel super awkward because, well, I’d already joined another one! They are always welcoming, however, and that’s a grace I don’t take for granted.

The obvious theme of the day’s readings was to determine what’s important to you and be willing to sacrifice to get it. For example, the priest’s brother had spent $1000 on his home prayer corner during a house remodel not to show off, but because God was important enough to drop that kind of cash. He reminded us to seek to be free from attachment to anything besides God. I could have used some more practical suggestions, but I appreciated such a clear message.


For more Mass fashion and commentary, visit Rosie at A Blog for My Mom for My Sunday Best.

My Sunday Best, hosted at A Blog for My Mom

Sunday Style: Are You Rich Soil for the Word?

We returned to Mr. Man’s parish this past weekend. This week’s homily didn’t shoot straight to my heart like last week’s, but Jesus game, so Mass was good. Here’s what I wore:

Sunday Style for July 15

Dress: Marshall’s, from forever ago
Shirt: Target
Shoes: same sandals from Target I’ve been wearing constantly this summer
Necklace: holy medals
Earrings: gift

I originally bought these sandals because they were (a) cute, (b) available in the store in my size, which is a rare occurrence since I have large feet in proportion with my height, and (c) not flip-flops. My friend Sabrina posted an Instagram photo of herself trying on some shoes several years ago now, captioning it with a comment that being an adult means less wearing of flip-flops and more wearing of real shoes. I took that to heart, so my $5 Old Navy flip-flops became inside shoes only.

Upon reflection, I’m not sure she really meant to make a jab at flip-flops. I think she was just (or also?) acknowledging that cheap shoes are best for younger feet! My grocery store job requires special shoes. Mine happen to have memory foam and be designed for food service work (i.e. standing for several hours nonstop). I can really feel the difference when I come home and change to much less supportive shoes.

It’s particularly significant because I have to wear shoes or slippers all the time (including around the house) due to chronic knee problems. I should probably put in some time in the coming months to buy better shoes.

This is supposed to be about church, though, not about adulting. Deacon P gave the homily at Mr. Man’s parish. As I mentioned at the beginning of this post, his attempt to make the readings “relevant” did not pierce me the way Fr. J’s did, but I appreciated his comments on Scripture. That is to say, in discussing the parable of the sower, he reminded us not to take the Word of God for granted. We hear it proclaimed every Sunday, but do we provide God with rich soil for the seeds of his Word? Do we barely let him onto the path of our lives, or do we fill up our hearts with so many other concerns that they’re like thorns choking him out?


For more Mass fashion and commentary, visit Rosie at A Blog for My Mom for My Sunday Best.

My Sunday Best, hosted at A Blog for My Mom

Sunday Style: Just What I Needed

I’m still adjusting to my random work schedule, but this past weekend (and the coming one!), it allowed me to go back to Mr. Man’s parish. It was comforting to be back in a familiar parish, but I also felt awkward because I have been obviously absent for so long. It’s a tiny parish, the kind where you might actually notice someone’s not showing up. It is a welcoming parish nonetheless.

Here’s what I wore:

Sunday Style for July 9

Dress: Old Navy
Shirt: Target
Shoes: Payless
Necklace: holy medals
Earrings: I don’t even remember, and you can’t see them, so we’ll call that a wash

A friend of mine once compared this dress to fireworks. I can’t deny that such a comment and a recent national holiday were on my mind when I picked this dress for this Sunday. I also chose it because I knew it’d be comfortable for the picnic/party Mr. Man and I attended after Mass. (And it was!)

Among my homily pet peeves are attempts to make everything “relevant” or near-accusations of the emotions I must be feeling. Thanks be to God, I don’t feel broken all that often, so a homily directed at the broken, for example, specifically doesn’t reach me. Fr. J managed to subvert that annoyance by finding a perhaps perfectly broad audience for his homily: those who have labored and are burdened. I can relate to those feelings a lot, and I was physically tired from a long work week and a packed day of chores. So yes, this time, I was feeling burdened, and I could relate.

He said that our world is filled with stressors: real, perceived, our own creation (“time-saving” gadgets that go awry, like my dishwasher when I ran it full of dirty dishes and empty of detergent), and those forced upon us. However, Jesus beckons us to come to him when we are burdened. If we’re sad, he’ll be sad with us. If we just want to rest, he’ll rest with us. If we’re angry, we can let him have it. He can take it. He was crucified; he can handle some yelling and fist-shaking. Living with God doesn’t need to be another stressor. It should be a place of rest.

When was the last time a homily spoke just the words you needed to hear?


For more Mass fashion and commentary, visit Rosie at A Blog for My Mom for My Sunday Best.

My Sunday Best, hosted at A Blog for My Mom

Sunday Style: Just Like Old Times

These past few weeks and weekends have been challenging, so I’m back to a Sunday Style two-fer.

June 24 (vigil)

Sunday Style for June 24

Top: Target
Skirt: Old Navy
Sandals: Target
Jewelry: Charming Charlie

Flipping through my photos as I write this post, I’m realizing that I wore this exact same set of necklace and earrings last week. Oh, well; it looked good both times.

I let Mr. Man pick our parish for this weekend. I needed to attend a late vigil Mass to accommodate my work schedule. (Always remember that you can shop and eat out on weekends because other people work then.) We had two options, but one was in Spanish. He picked the Spanish one!

I’ve been to Mass in Spanish before, and I understand some Spanish, so I was fine with that. He is still learning, so we met in the middle. I paid attention to the Spanish the same way I would if he hadn’t been there, and I found the correct sections in the bilingual missalette to help him supplement what he was hearing. It helped immensely that the Mass was the same format we’re used to in English. I knew what the words were in English at a given point, so I knew what Spanish words to look for. It was an adventure.

I wasn’t quite confident enough in my Spanish writing skills to take my homily notes in Spanish, though, so I took them in English. In retrospect, taking English notes from spoken Spanish was probably just as difficult as taking Spanish notes from spoken Spanish would have been. Every time I wrote something down, I switched to mentally processing in English, which meant I wasn’t paying any attention to what the priest was saying because that was in Spanish. That’s why I took notes in Spanish when I took my Spanish classes in college. Code switching is tough!

The priest focused on Jesus’ admonition that the disciples not be afraid. “No temas” is that command in Spanish; he said that a lot, which confused Mr. Man. He kept hearing “no te más,” which is nonsense. As the priest said, we should fear losing the intimate relationship between God and our souls more than we fear any earthly pain. We should behave like children of God, even as people try to cause us to stumble like the mutterers did to Jeremiah, and instead worry about eternal condemnation.

He also told a brief story. I couldn’t decipher whether it was about him and his own father or a random Story Young Man and his father, but the scenario was a father giving advice to a son seeking a wife. He said to look for a woman who fears God, one who will not likely be found in bars and dance clubs. If she fears God, she will be holy and faithful to her husband. That seemed like good advice.

I don’t think we’ll be going to Mass in Spanish again anytime soon, but it was a fun diversion from our normal.

July 1 (also a vigil)

Sunday Style for July 1

Entire outfit except the earrings: Target
Earrings: craft fair

I used to wear this outfit on Thursdays. I had dance class on Thursday evenings, so all I had to do was change my top to active wear and I was ready for class. It’s built around the skirt and leggings, though, so that made it a Mass outfit, too.

My schedule clashed with Mr. Man’s, so we went to Mass separately for the first time since I moved to Louisville. I missed him. I attended yet another parish I’d never visited before (the late vigil option in English), which had a visiting priest from the Philippines. Most of his homily was his appeal for a home for aging religious in his diocese, which he connected with Jesus’ comment that anyone who gives only a cup of cold water to a disciple will receive great reward. Building the home is like drawing water. It was nice to have a mission appeal connected so well to the day’s readings.

He started his homily, though, with a comment on loving family more than Jesus. It stuck out for me because it wasn’t connected to his appeal at all (which I appreciated). We’re supposed to love God even more than we love our families. Perhaps, he suggested, couples who fall out of love with each other have really fallen out of love with God. Without their love for God at the center of their relationship, it falls apart.

I miss belonging to a parish, but I’m glad to have opportunities like these to stretch my Mass experience a little and explore the greater Church here in Louisville.


For more Mass fashion and commentary, visit Rosie at A Blog for My Mom for My Sunday Best.

My Sunday Best, hosted at A Blog for My Mom

Sunday Style: Not Yet Ordinary

Strictly speaking, it’s been Ordinary Time for a few weeks. We always follow Easter with some more solemnities, though, so it doesn’t feel like Ordinary Time. I guess it does if you go to Mass on weekdays, too, but I am not in a daily Mass season at the moment, so it doesn’t feel quite ordinary yet. (Yes, I know the real reason we call the weeks “ordinary,” but still.)

What does feel unfortunately ordinary (the normal kind) is that I was wrapped up in many things for the last few weeks, and none of them were blogging, so here are two weeks of what I wore Sunday.

June 10: Trinity Sunday (Vigil)

Sunday Style for June 10

Blouse: Target
Skirt: random mall store
Shoes: Payless
Earrings: gift

Again, I wanted to show off my toes. Again, Mr. Man was frustrated by how slowly I walk in these shoes. I’m pretty sure that’s a man thing, though. Men’s shoes are always practical, so they never require a different walk. The most they need are comfort insoles. This blouse is what I typically wear for interviews. I like that it’s structured, and although I usually wear it with a skirt, it works with pants, too. And it doesn’t need to be tucked in!

Although Trinity Sunday and Corpus Christi are special solemnities, they are not “continuations of the Easter season,” as the deacon at Mass said. I was quickly appeased by his quite excellent homily about the Trinity. Yes, blah blah mystery, blah blah can’t understand it, but, as our deacon also said, acknowledging the mysterious reality of the Trinity doesn’t mean we can’t talk about it at all.

The Trinity, he said, is not so much a thing as a relationship. In the first reading, God shares his name with Moses. Giving your name is usually the beginning of a relationship, right? Similarly, the Gospel highlights that God gave his son—in relationship, not just sending him off and recalling him just as brusquely.

As Christians, we all have a relationship with the relationship of the Trinity. It begins when we are baptized in the name of the Trinity, it is strengthened by the trinitarian blessing at Mass, and we encourage it daily when we pray under the Sign of the Cross. Not bad for a mystery.

June 18: Corpus Christi

Sunday Style for June 18

Shirt: Target
Skirt: Target
Shoes: Old Navy
Jewelry: Charming Charlie

I work on a rotating schedule right now, so Mr. Man and I went to Mass in the evening because I was working all day. I felt distinctly unpretty by the end of the day, so I made myself feel pretty again with this outfit. (There might have been some singing in the mirror, and it might have been from a famous musical based on Romeo and Juliet.)

We returned to a parish we’ve visited before due to its terrifically convenient late evening Mass time. It’s not exactly known for being old-school. The parish we went to for Pentecost omitted the sequence, but this parish included the Corpus Christi sequence! The lector gave maybe the most awkward reading/recitation of a sequence I’ve ever heard, but the sequence was in fact done.

Fr. C has a very “live out loud,” audience-participatory style to his homilies. He walked to the back of the church and escorted a random trio of people from the back right up to the front of the sanctuary. (I have no fear of this tactic. I was actually whispering “pick me!” as he was warning people not to try to avoid eye contact.) This trio turned out to be a father and his two young adult children, and they played along well, serving the pastor’s point that fathers often give their children advice about the future based on what they themselves have experienced. Similarly, Moses spends much of Deuteronomy giving the Israelites as much wisdom as he can before they enter the Promised Land.

The Bible Timeline is where I first learned about Deuteronomy, so I was bursting with excitement to hear Fr. C give such a succinct, easy explanation of that part of salvation history. We tend to think of Moses as being a near-perfect figure, but he did not make it into the Promised Land because of his late-in-life act of disobedience to God. The best he could do was to prepare his spiritual children by telling them how to live blessed lives, remembering who really sustains them through hunger and thirst: God.

In the Gospel, Jesus reveals that the manna from heaven was just beginner bread. His body will be the real bread from heaven. I kind of wanted Fr. C to lean a little heavier on the point of the Real Presence of Jesus in the Eucharist, but I guess no homily can have everything. He managed to connect Father’s Day to church very neatly and to encourage us to seek spiritual nourishment in the Eucharist, so maybe that’s good enough for one week.


For more Mass fashion and commentary, visit Rosie at A Blog for My Mom for My Sunday Best.

My Sunday Best, hosted at A Blog for My Mom

Sunday Style: Pentecost Possession

After only two months, I’m already accustomed to going to Mass with Mr. Man. It helps tremendously that, not having lived in Louisville independently, I don’t have any parish ties. I’m about ready to settle down with a parish, though. We’ll see how that goes.

Here’s what I wore on Sunday:

Sunday Style for June 4

Top: Target
Dress (worn as a skirt): The Limited
Shoes: Payless wedges
Earrings: ancient gift

Everyone seems to be more interested in dressing liturgically when the color of the day is red. Did your pastor ask you to wear red to Mass for Pentecost? That’s becoming really common: the explicit request for the congregation to wear the liturgical color for Pentecost. Sometimes I also hear it on Palm Sunday, but not as often. It makes me want to shout, “But wait! There’s more! You can dress liturgically for basically half the year!” (No one owns twenty weeks of green clothes for Ordinary Time.)

But I’ll take any number of fellow liturgical dressers. I forgot to request that Mr. Man join me this week. Maybe he’ll wear a white shirt for Trinity Sunday?

We returned to last week’s parish. Father L began his homily by comparing the process of learning to follow Jesus to learning a trade. I don’t think as many people learn trades as they used to, though. Think about how many people struggle with cooking. That’s something you usually learn at home. Basic car repair tasks like checking tire air pressure and replacing windshield wiper blades become mysteries. There’s a whole category of things that I hear people complain they “didn’t learn in school,” but school isn’t supposed to be the place where you learn everything.

Those were my thoughts, though, not his point. His point was that apprenticeship always starts with the easy lessons, the ones that seem dumb. “Here’s a socket wrench. This is what it does.” “Brown this ground beef.” When you thought you were learning how to build a table or make lasagna, the first steps seem like boring hoops to hump through before you get to the good stuff.

In the same way, he said, the basics of the Catholic life seem like a long list of boring rules that don’t get you anywhere. “Go to Mass every Sunday.” “Don’t use birth control.” The goal is heaven, but Day 1 can make it feel like the goal is “don’t have any fun.”

In later days and years of our spiritual maturity, we’re heading toward the goal more obviously. It’s easy to forget that the spiritual masters became so, however, because they mastered the easy steps first. St. Teresa of Calcutta didn’t have to wonder whether she really needed to go to Mass on Sunday or if she could skip it occasionally because she was busy. She just went.

Getting to that level of mastery requires the help of the Holy Spirit. We can ask for his help. We should ask for his help and be attentive to receiving it. We must beg the Holy Spirit for possession of our beginner-level hearts to lead us toward spiritual mastery in heaven.


For more Mass fashion and commentary, visit Rosie at A Blog for My Mom for My Sunday Best.

My Sunday Best, hosted at A Blog for My Mom

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